Hawaii Tropical Botanical Garden

Hawaii Tropical Botanical Garden

The Hawaii Tropical Botanical Garden is a museum of living plants that attracts photographers, gardeners, botanists, scientists, and nature lovers from around the world. It is also a gorgeous and unique wedding destination.  The Garden’s collection of tropical plants is international in scope. Over 2,000 species, representing more than 125 families and 750 genera, are found in this one-of-a-kind garden.

The 40-acre valley is a natural greenhouse, protected from buffeting tradewinds and blessed with fertile volcanic soil. Throughout this garden valley, nature trails meander through a true tropical rainforest, crossing bubbling streams, passing several beautiful waterfalls and the exciting ocean vistas along the rugged Pacific coast.

Weddings In Paradise

Imagine…

Getting married at one of the most romantic places in the world!!

The site overlooks Onomea Bay, where the palm trees sway in the ocean breeze and the tropical scents tickle your nose.

Legend recalls two lovers of Kahali’i who are embodied in the “Twin Rocks” and now stand today as sentinels at the head of Onomea Bay.

Here, in this magical place, you stand with the person you are pledging to spend the rest of your life with. May your love reflect the strength and commitment represented by the lovers of Kahali’i.

The Legend of Twin Rocks

twin rocks wedding siteThe vilage of Kahali’i was located on this large point of land which extends into Onomea Bay. Though the village is gone, the descendents of Kahali’i residents still remember some of the legends concerning the area’s landmarks. One story tells of the origin of two rock formations at the head of Onomea Bay that are said to be a young man and woman, known as the lovers of Kahali’i.

Legend has it that one day, a chief of the village spotted many canoes with sails heading shoreward in their direction. Fearing an attack, the chiefs and village elders held a council to determine a course of action. They decided to build a reef to prevent a landing on their beaches. Not having the means to complete the task quickly enough, they asked for two young lovers be the guides and protectors of the village by giving their lives. Two willing individuals were found.

That night a decree was sent to all who lived at Kahali’i to remain indoors from sunset to sunrise without making any light or sound, on penalty of death. In the light of the new day, everyone went down to the shoreline where they were amazed to find the lovers gone, and in their place two gigantic rock formations at the entrance of the bay, attached to each other, as if on guard.

The chief informed the people that no canoe could pass the treacherous currents swirling around the rocks unless allowed to do so by the guardians. The lovers and their offspring still stand today, sentinels at the head of the bay.